We are ready to dance

Our Dance Festival organisation team (Sophia, John, Ralph, Jane, Diana & Hannah) is ready to dance – after a lot of organisational work.

The Festival hub info desk in the Town Hall foyer will be open:
Friday 6pm-8pm Saturday 10am:30-5:30pm Sunday 10:30am-5:30pm.

At the info hub we’re happy to answer your questions and collect your feedback.
You can exchange your day and weekend ticket for  a wrist band, buy tickets for single events and check if the workshop of your choice is likely to be full – or cancelled.
Volunteers and dance leaders can collect their free single tickets or day wrist bands (or upgrade for a w/e wrist band).
The Town Hall Café will be open:
Fri 20th Oct
: Food available from 8.30am-7pm, drinks until 9pm
Sat 21st Oct: Food available from 9am -7pm, drinks until 10pm
Sun 22nd Oct: Food available from 10am – 7pm, drinks until 9pm

The café will serve proper food as well as the usual drinks and treats

 

Traditional Ceilidh with Peace Works

[“TH1”] Friday 19:30, town hall
tickets – programme

Come along and enjoy dancing a range of traditional dances in lines, sets and circles to their polkas, jigs and reels, with a couple of additional Celtic tunes thrown in for good measure between dances.

“Peace Works” is a local Ceilidh band who has been playing together for many years for community events and to raise funds for charities dear to their hearts. They have gathered a large collection of tunes and dances, mostly from the Celtic tradition, including many of the Ceilidh favourites and a few lesser known gems.

Jim Ledwidge leads the band on piano accordion and your main caller will be Rosie Benton.

Ceilidh video from the 1st Dance Festival [may need some time to load]

North West Morris workshop with Persephone

[“TH2“] saturday 11am, town halltickets – programme

Our North West style of Morris dancing grew out of the processions common at holiday times in the north west mill towns in Victorian times. We dance in sets of 8 people, in 2 lines of 4 moving forwards and backwards and performing various “figures” or patterns interspersed with a chorus figure. There are two basic steps: a “single step”, similar to skipping, and a “rant” or polka type step. We hold sticks, mill bobbins or garlands. Our music is mainly traditional, played on accordions, melodeons, clarinet, whistle and drums.

In performance we wear clogs, with rubber on the soles rather than the traditional irons which many men’s teams wear. For the workshop, trainers or similar are ideal. Fairly loose fitting or stretchy trousers are best for easy leg movement.

Persephone first performed in 1978, dancing in the North West Style. Many of the dances originate from the following of the rushcarts, the annual event of bringing new rushes for the church floor, in a ceremonial procession. This processional style further developed once the streets of the industrial towns of the North became paved.

There is a long tradition of clog stepping in the north of England which needed a hard floor. With the paving of the streets, clog stepping quickly became inseparable from the processional Morris of the North West; their large bands made it possible for the music to be heard over the sound of the clogs. Women dancers have always been a part of this type of dance, and today women’s, men’s and mixed teams can be seen.

Persephone is easily recognisable by the dancers’ black kits with bright green and yellow sashes and ribbons, whilst the band wears black and striking top hats with green and yellow ribbons; the side all wear black clogs with bells. The exuberant style and standard of dancing is maintained by weekly practices throughout the year at Hunsworth Community Centre, near Cleckheaton, West Yorkshire.

Persephone dances a mixture of traditional and new dances written specially for the team, using bobbins, garlands, sticks and slings. The band comprises accordions, melodeons, clarinet, whistle, a large drum, and a snare drum.

Persephone can be seen at venues throughout the country, dancing at festivals, in processions, at weekends of dance and all manner of other events, summer and winter alike.

Persephone is always keen to welcome new female dancers and musicians (female or male), both new and experienced.

 www.persephonemorris.co.uk , Facebook: Persephone Women’s Morris team

Jive Class 40s/50s with Sue Aldham

[“TH3“] saturday 1:30pm, town hall – tickets – programme

My partner Nigel and I teach jive which is s blend of 1940’s Swing Jive and 1950’s Rock n Roll to absolute Beginners and to the more advanced Jiver’s.

At the Hebden Bridge festival we will be doing demonstrations and teaching people new to Jive, showing them the basic footwork, a few easy moves and a couple of strolls which, unlike jive for which you will need a partner, are individual dances, similar to line dances but done to jive music.

If you are bitten by the bug, you can come along to our Jive Class in Halifax the following week.

See www.jiveclass.co.uk for full details.

Circle Dance Around The World with Sophia Hatch

[“TH4“] Saturday 4pm, town hall – tickets – programme

I came across Circle Dance at Findhorn Foundation over 30yrs ago when I was looking for healing and I was immediately hooked! I then trained there and started teaching, sowing many seeds of the dance in the North of England making Circe Dance my vocation and living. I teach regular local groups as well as days/weekends and weeks.

This session I will teach a variety of simple dances from around the world – both traditional and recent. Some will be lively and upbeat and others gentle or meditative. The music is equally eclectic / worldwide from Bob Marley to Bach! – So maybe we have a dance from the Shetland Isles / South Africa / Bolivia / Bulgaria / East European Gipsy / a meditational dance with music by Ravi Shankar with words that are a peace mantra. There are thousands of dances and moods! Some dances are very ancient and others recently choreographed.

The aim is about creating JOY, UNITY ,COMMUNITY, RAISING ENERGY and PEACE .

 

You DON’T need a partner and NO experience needed. Children are welcome but must come accompanied by an adult and be wanting to give it a go! Barefoot or flat soft shoes. Wear layers so you can peel off and on as you feel! Bring some water and an open mind and heart! Feel free to contact me if you have any queries;

www.sophiafreedancer.co.uk

Collegiate Shag with Malte and Grace, Manshagster

[“TH5“] Saturday 7.30pm, town hall  – tickets – programme

Collegiate Shag (or just “Shag”) is a partnered uptempo Swing dance 
originating from the beginning of the swing era in the 1920s. It is
usually danced to faster (180-220 bpm) swing, pre-swing and jazz music.
 Collegiate Shag had a worldwide revival in the last few years, from
 only a few enthusiasts dancing Shag to a wide phenomenon within British
 and many European swing dance scenes.
 Sometimes fast, sometimes silly, and always a funny dance, Collegiate
 Shag is sometimes referred to as the “Happy Dance”.

Malte and Georgie started weekly Collegiate Shag classes in Manchester 
in January under the name Manshagster.
 Malte started partnered dancing in 2009 and went through various styles 
and different music, before he fell in love with Swing dances a few 
years ago because he liked the openness of the people and the amount of
 expression that jazz music makes possible. Among the swing dances, 
Collegiate Shag is his favourite for the amount of energy, foolishness,
 and musicality it allows. 
Georgie fell in love with Shag on the first night. Having explored a
 few swing dances, Collegiate Shag is her absolute favourite, and she 
can equally be found on dance floors across the country, always smiling, 
with her camera, and up for a Shag-related joke.
PS: Georgie can’t come, so Malte will teach with Grace

Facebook: Manshagster

The first link is a video of the “original” Collegiate Shag, the second
link is a dance performance:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5trc70HEI8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wasM8nF9gg

Disco – dance for life with Roger King

[“TH6“] saturday 9-11pm, town hall  – tickets – programme

I just love playing music that releases fear stress and heartache and attracts authentic miracles for love and forgiveness. I listen to so many tracks for each dance for life!
Come together & move your body & soul. Bring your friends, anyone who wants to dance free.
No fixed steps. Nothing is right or wrong. A place to dance like nobody is watching, with beautiful music. Bring nibbles to share! My love Roger King

“I work with abused and traumatised men and women. I take them from survival mode into living mode where they find their wisdom, courage and inner power to create new beliefs to build a beautiful life. I Skype all over the world.” – Roger King
Roger has just completed his 7th book: A Little Book of Love.

www.rogerking.info

Longsword Workshop with Ryburn Longsword and Sue Coe

[“TH7“] sunday 11am, townhall  – tickets – programme

Longsword dance is a Yorkshire-based form of traditional dance performed by five, six or eight dancers dancing together in a circle, making a number of movements in which the dancers go over or under the swords. The middle sections of the dances rely on linked rings of dancers working as a team. The dance normally ends with the production and display of a ‘lock’ where swords are intertwined in one of a variety of shapes. The session will aim to introduce the basic figures & shapes used in Longsword dances & show pupils & teachers how these can be adapted & new figures developed & how they fit together to invent a new dance. 

The workshop will include:

  • Basic figures in Longsword dances – hilt & point rings, baskets, locks etc
  • Add more figures – double unders, double overs, arches, etc

Extension work could include:

  • Adapting existing figures
  • Creating new figures
  • Fitting figures together to create a new dance
  • Giving the new dance a name
  • Preparing for a performance

Ryburn Longsword  dance is a Yorkshire-based form of traditional dance performed by five, six or eight dancers dancing together in a circle, making a number of movements in which the dancers go over or under one of the swords. The dance normally ends with the production and display of a ‘lock’ where swords are intertwined in one of a variety of v shapes.

Its origins remain obscure but it is known that many Yorkshire villages had their own dances which would often be performed as part of Christmas and New Year celebrations.

Ryburn Longsword is based in Ripponden and has been dancing together since 1994. Some of our dances are traditional and come from villages across Yorkshire; others have been created by members of the group.

We welcome dancers of all ages and abilities to our Wednesday evening practice which take place from 7.30pm to 9.00pm at 103 Oldham Rd, Ripponden. We are very lucky to be able to dance to traditional live music for our practices, which are very friendly and informal.  Our ultimate aim is to dance with precision and style to public audiences, so dancers and musicians are encouraged to attend practice regularly.

If you would like to try Longsword dancing, please contact Pauline Jones on 01422 823099. You can find out more about Ryburn Three Step events and activities on our website; www.ryburn3step.org.uk

Appalachian Beginners with Fiddle ‘n Feet

{“TH8“] sunday 1:30, townhall  – tickets – programme

Fiddle ‘n Feet are a mixed Appalachian dance team formed over 15 years ago. 
We currently have 10 dancers and 5 musicians and practice in Shipley, West Yorkshire.

We choreograph our own dances which are lively and energetic consisting of traditional Appalachian dance steps from the Appalachian mountains of America.  Our musicians play old-time and bluegrass fiddle tunes.

We perform at festivals, dance and charity events mainly in Yorkshire and Lancashire and sometimes further afield.

Anyone wishing to join our workshop will be required to wear hard soled shoes or tap shoes. No experience necessary.  Complete beginners welcome. 

Our workshop will consist of a performance of one of our dances.  We will teach simple Appalachian steps from this dance which hopefully at the end of the workshop we will all perform.  The musicians play old time and bluegrass fiddle tunes.

Our website is www.fiddlenfeet.co.uk

Argentine Tango with Dickson Shumba

[“TH9“] sunday 4pm, townhall – book here
back to programme

Experienced Teacher, Dickson Shumba, learnt the Argentine tango from a variety of teachers, prominent Argentineans and others. Dickson runs Argentine Tango Lessons, Milongas and Practicas in Yorkshire and surrounding areas.  Dickson’s classes are friendly and welcoming.  Dickson has a big collection of music and plays mostly Traditional Argentine Tango Music in Tandas of Three or Four. Tanda format TTVTTM punctuated with occasional tanda of what the dancers request.

Dickson’s website is www.dicksontango.danceorg.uk

Les Panards Dansants, dancers & band (Breton and French Dancing)

[“TH10“] sunday22,  7:30pm-9:30pm,  town hall  – tickets – programme

Traditional French dancing takes many forms. Depending on the area they originate from, the dances can be performed in circles, lines, open circles or couples. But what they all have in common is they are very attractive, addictive and accompanied by fascinating and vibrant music.
Still very much alive in France, those dances can be seen performed on stage by the “groups folkloriques”, or danced at “bals folks”, where dancers of all ages and abilities can participate, dancing to live music.
In the workshop Geli, Monica and Toni will be teach simple dances from various French regions to live instrumental music from ‘Les Panards Dansants’ band or singing. No partner is necessary. Fun is guaranteed at the Bal – with our live band.

www.frenchdanceleeds.co.uk/Facebook: Les Panards Dansants