Collegiate Shag with Malte and Grace, Manshagster

[“TH5“] Saturday 7.30pm, town hall  – tickets – programme

Collegiate Shag (or just “Shag”) is a partnered uptempo Swing dance 
originating from the beginning of the swing era in the 1920s. It is
usually danced to faster (180-220 bpm) swing, pre-swing and jazz music.
 Collegiate Shag had a worldwide revival in the last few years, from
 only a few enthusiasts dancing Shag to a wide phenomenon within British
 and many European swing dance scenes.
 Sometimes fast, sometimes silly, and always a funny dance, Collegiate
 Shag is sometimes referred to as the “Happy Dance”.

Malte and Georgie started weekly Collegiate Shag classes in Manchester 
in January under the name Manshagster.
 Malte started partnered dancing in 2009 and went through various styles 
and different music, before he fell in love with Swing dances a few 
years ago because he liked the openness of the people and the amount of
 expression that jazz music makes possible. Among the swing dances, 
Collegiate Shag is his favourite for the amount of energy, foolishness,
 and musicality it allows. 
Georgie fell in love with Shag on the first night. Having explored a
 few swing dances, Collegiate Shag is her absolute favourite, and she 
can equally be found on dance floors across the country, always smiling, 
with her camera, and up for a Shag-related joke.
PS: Georgie can’t come, so Malte will teach with Grace

Facebook: Manshagster

The first link is a video of the “original” Collegiate Shag, the second
link is a dance performance:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5trc70HEI8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wasM8nF9gg

Les Panards Dansants, dancers & band (Breton and French Dancing)

[“TH10“] sunday22,  7:30pm-9:30pm,  town hall  – tickets – programme

Traditional French dancing takes many forms. Depending on the area they originate from, the dances can be performed in circles, lines, open circles or couples. But what they all have in common is they are very attractive, addictive and accompanied by fascinating and vibrant music.
Still very much alive in France, those dances can be seen performed on stage by the “groups folkloriques”, or danced at “bals folks”, where dancers of all ages and abilities can participate, dancing to live music.
In the workshop Geli, Monica and Toni will be teach simple dances from various French regions to live instrumental music from ‘Les Panards Dansants’ band or singing. No partner is necessary. Fun is guaranteed at the Bal – with our live band.

www.frenchdanceleeds.co.uk/Facebook: Les Panards Dansants