North West Morris workshop with Persephone

[“TH2“] saturday 11am, town halltickets – programme

Our North West style of Morris dancing grew out of the processions common at holiday times in the north west mill towns in Victorian times. We dance in sets of 8 people, in 2 lines of 4 moving forwards and backwards and performing various “figures” or patterns interspersed with a chorus figure. There are two basic steps: a “single step”, similar to skipping, and a “rant” or polka type step. We hold sticks, mill bobbins or garlands. Our music is mainly traditional, played on accordions, melodeons, clarinet, whistle and drums.

In performance we wear clogs, with rubber on the soles rather than the traditional irons which many men’s teams wear. For the workshop, trainers or similar are ideal. Fairly loose fitting or stretchy trousers are best for easy leg movement.

Persephone first performed in 1978, dancing in the North West Style. Many of the dances originate from the following of the rushcarts, the annual event of bringing new rushes for the church floor, in a ceremonial procession. This processional style further developed once the streets of the industrial towns of the North became paved.

There is a long tradition of clog stepping in the north of England which needed a hard floor. With the paving of the streets, clog stepping quickly became inseparable from the processional Morris of the North West; their large bands made it possible for the music to be heard over the sound of the clogs. Women dancers have always been a part of this type of dance, and today women’s, men’s and mixed teams can be seen.

Persephone is easily recognisable by the dancers’ black kits with bright green and yellow sashes and ribbons, whilst the band wears black and striking top hats with green and yellow ribbons; the side all wear black clogs with bells. The exuberant style and standard of dancing is maintained by weekly practices throughout the year at Hunsworth Community Centre, near Cleckheaton, West Yorkshire.

Persephone dances a mixture of traditional and new dances written specially for the team, using bobbins, garlands, sticks and slings. The band comprises accordions, melodeons, clarinet, whistle, a large drum, and a snare drum.

Persephone can be seen at venues throughout the country, dancing at festivals, in processions, at weekends of dance and all manner of other events, summer and winter alike.

Persephone is always keen to welcome new female dancers and musicians (female or male), both new and experienced.

 www.persephonemorris.co.uk , Facebook: Persephone Women’s Morris team

Biodanza with Noel Watkins

Biodanza Noel[“MC2”] Saturday 11am, Methodist Church   – tickets – programme

Biodanza (dance of life) is a system of human integration (practiced in 53 countries around the world) originally devised in Chile, south America by Rolando Toro Areneda. It uses an eclectic range of music, exercises, dances and group encounter to help us access our emotions (especially our joy) and to be fully in the moment (the vivencia). The sessions stimulate the five lines within us which need to be fully expressed so that we can achieve our true potential and be truly happy. These five lines are vitality, creativity, affectivity, sexuality and transcendence.
A session (vivencia) provides us with a complete work out and relaxation programme for body, mind and soul

Noel Watkins – Biodanza

Noel Watkins is West Yorkshire’s only fully trained Biodanza facilitator and one of only a handful of individuals qualified to train others to be teachers. He is an engaging storyteller and has over 25 years teaching experience in mainstream primary education. He is very passionate about helping others realise their full potential and is committed to the creative process in building sustainable communities of the future.

Whirling Dance and Freedom with Alileau

SORRY! This event is CANCELLED – see News Update
[“YC2“] Saturday 11amyoga centre  – tickets – programme

Workshop session about Mevlevi Whirling Dervishes Dance

Programme of the session:
1) Relaxation-Meditation
2)
Preparation
3)
Tour study-balance
4)
Whirling

Please could participants wear white dress (white loose pants and shirt), that would be nice for the spirit of the practice.

“Come, come, whoever you are
Wanderer, worshiper, lover of leaving
It doesn’t matter
Ours is not a caravan of despair
Even if you have broken your vows a thousand times
Come, yet again come, come.”

 Dalal-Ud-Din RUMI

 Alileau Alileau became Semazen in the Order of Dancers in Istanbul in the tradition of Mevlana Rumi in June 2016, following his work supporting Syrian refugees in Turkey practicing Body Arts, music and circus skills, practises of Qi-Qong, and Do-In (Self Shiatsu) After a hard training, Sheikr (master) Yakup Baba invited me to celebrate the ceremony of the benediction of trust in the Sufism path and offered my robe (whirling dance dress), to enter in the path of becoming a Semazen whirling dancer in the order of Mevlevi tradition in Istanbul of Mevlana Djalal-ud-Din RUMI.

Little Rascals – a creative workshop in Physical Dance Theatre for Kids

[“CA2“] saturday 11am  Combined Arts – tickets – programme

Anna Holmes’ love of dance began here in Hebden Bridge as soon as she mastered the ability to walk. At the age of 15, she was selected on the Centre of Advanced Training scheme at the prestigious Northern School of Contemporary Dance; after six years of intense contemporary and balletic training, Anna left with first-class honours.

Since then, she has been touring nationally with JV2 – the professional development scheme of the Jasmin Vardimon Company. She has had the privilege to collaborate with choreographers such as Jasmin Vardimon, Marilena Dara, Jukstapoz and Sally Marie. During her training, Anna, and her partner, have created their own company ‘Northern Rascals’, a multi-disciplinary company that they hope to bring to a venue near you!

This fun and innovative workshop will allow youngsters to express and tap into their bounds of creativity through a series of theatrical dance games. We aim to create an awareness of how powerful the combination of voice and movement can be in expressing a variety of themes and scenarios. For example, we will play with our imagination to enter a world where anything can exist, from floors made of treacle to morphing into scary and very silly monsters! The class will be focussed on letting go, having fun and really finding our inner (or outer) clown. So sign up, come down and let’s get silly!

Open to all ages, young and old, so stick around parents and get stuck in! Maybe double-headed monsters can exist too…

Longsword Workshop with Ryburn Longsword and Sue Coe

[“TH7“] sunday 11am, townhall  – tickets – programme

Longsword dance is a Yorkshire-based form of traditional dance performed by five, six or eight dancers dancing together in a circle, making a number of movements in which the dancers go over or under the swords. The middle sections of the dances rely on linked rings of dancers working as a team. The dance normally ends with the production and display of a ‘lock’ where swords are intertwined in one of a variety of shapes. The session will aim to introduce the basic figures & shapes used in Longsword dances & show pupils & teachers how these can be adapted & new figures developed & how they fit together to invent a new dance. 

The workshop will include:

  • Basic figures in Longsword dances – hilt & point rings, baskets, locks etc
  • Add more figures – double unders, double overs, arches, etc

Extension work could include:

  • Adapting existing figures
  • Creating new figures
  • Fitting figures together to create a new dance
  • Giving the new dance a name
  • Preparing for a performance

Ryburn Longsword  dance is a Yorkshire-based form of traditional dance performed by five, six or eight dancers dancing together in a circle, making a number of movements in which the dancers go over or under one of the swords. The dance normally ends with the production and display of a ‘lock’ where swords are intertwined in one of a variety of v shapes.

Its origins remain obscure but it is known that many Yorkshire villages had their own dances which would often be performed as part of Christmas and New Year celebrations.

Ryburn Longsword is based in Ripponden and has been dancing together since 1994. Some of our dances are traditional and come from villages across Yorkshire; others have been created by members of the group.

We welcome dancers of all ages and abilities to our Wednesday evening practice which take place from 7.30pm to 9.00pm at 103 Oldham Rd, Ripponden. We are very lucky to be able to dance to traditional live music for our practices, which are very friendly and informal.  Our ultimate aim is to dance with precision and style to public audiences, so dancers and musicians are encouraged to attend practice regularly.

If you would like to try Longsword dancing, please contact Pauline Jones on 01422 823099. You can find out more about Ryburn Three Step events and activities on our website; www.ryburn3step.org.uk

Dance for all – with Natalie Speake

 Sunday 11am, riversidetickets – programme

“I will be running this session with David, a young man with severe autism and his parents, plus some extra friends and family members
We would like to open the workshop up for limited number of 15 extra people to join in. If you have a learning disability, then we would require you to be accompanied by a carer or suitable support worker.

I have been working with David for the past 8 years and running regular dance sessions for him and his family.  The success of these sessions has led to regular family dance sessions to celebrate birthdays, Christmas and other occasions. They are uniquely crafted around David’s individual needs and allow an opportunity for him to connect in an artistic and meaningful way with his family and friends.

We would like to offer the opportunity out to our wider community to come along and take part in this wonderful celebration of dance and individuality. No previous dance experience necessary but a willingness to join in and have fun is essential!”